instagram:

Finding the Drama of Light and Shadow in Tehran with @f64s125

For more of Ako’s street images from Tehran, follow @f64s125 on Instagram.

In the nooks and crannies of Tehran’s streets, photojournalist Ako Salemi (@f64s125) finds the moments when light, shadow, environment and people all come together in exquisite balance. “Sometimes I shoot just from the hip,” says Ako, “and sometimes I wait for ‘the decisive moment’ when the action, the light and all other elements make the right composition.”

Ako’s passion for black and white images began at an early age when he discovered a love for the classic films of Alfred Hitchcock, Billy Wilder, and Ingmar Bergman. He even graduated with a degree in drama hoping to be a filmmaker. But it was his shy demeanor and introverted character that led him to realize that he is better suited to what he calls “an art that can be made in solitude.”

Ako began expressing his visual ideas through photography and for the past two years has turned to Instagram to share his vision of street life in Tehran. “It’s as if I am having a non-judgmental dialogue with each of these Instagram friends that could not be expressed in words. I’m showing a piece of my city’s life and a piece of me.”

(via ibn-batuta)

2 weeks ago 1,321 notes

"Of Course Mona, Harara, Blue Bra Lady, Emad" 
Screenprints by Ganzeer
ganzeerism
:

Four screenprints I designed in Cairo sometime in 2013, screenprinted by Kevin Caplicki in Brooklyn at Bushwick Print Lab.

Top image - from left to right:

Title: Of Course, Mona
Edition: 30 
Dimensions: 19x25 Inches
Media: screenprint on paper
Description: “Of course the army has protected the revolution” is juxtaposed against an image of Mona Eltahawy, an Egyptian-American journalist, who was sexually assaulted and had both her arms broken by Egyptian Riot police during a protest against military rule in November 2011.

Title: Of Course, Harara
Edition: 30 
Dimensions: 19x25 Inches
Media: screenprint on paper
Description: “Of course the army has protected the revolution,” a sentence much propagated by the Egyptian regime since the fall of Mubarak is juxtaposed against a portrait of Ahmed Harara, an Egyptian protestor who lost an eye to a bullet on January 28th, 2011, and the other eye during anti-military protests-become-clashes near the Ministry of Interiors on November 19, 2011, a day known as the Battle of the Eyes of Freedom where many protestors lost their eyes to a police sniper.

Title: Of Course, Blue Bra Lady
Edition: 30 (depicted above is a version hand-colored with blue and pink highlights)
Dimensions: 19x25 Inches
Media: screenprint on paper
Description: The text reads “Of course the army has protected the revolution.” This sentence, regularly propagated by the Egyptian regime since the spark of the Egyptian revolution is juxtaposed against the backdrop of one protestor who’s gotten a taste of that protection first hand. Known as “The Blue Bra Girl,” this woman was unclothed, and severely kicked and beaten by several Military Police officers during a protest on December 17th, 2011 calling on the illegitimacy of Egyptian Parliament.

Title: Of Course, Emad
Edition: 30 
Dimensions: 19x25 Inches
Media: screenprint on paper
Description: Sheikh Emad Effat, an Al-Azhar University Senior, was shot dead during a massive anti-parliament/anti-military protest on December 17, 2011. This, by the way, at a time when the Muslim Brotherhood was supportive of the military and had managed to dominate parliament. Sheikh Emad’s portrait is juxtaposed against a sentence commonly propagated by the regime in Egypt: “Of course the army protected the revolution.”

3 weeks ago 58 notes

A dose of optimism from Syrian artist Fares Cachoux : Top: “Damascus will become colorful again.” Bottom: “Homs will become colorful again.”

3 weeks ago 94 notes
“ROUTES” SERIES
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

We’re very excited to announce a call for submissions for our latest series! A collaboration with Knooz Room, who are also developing our new website, “ROUTES” will be the first project to be featured on Mashallah News “2.0.” 
The decline of the Ottoman Empire and the colonial encounter it facilitated between the Middle East and Europe dramatically and permanently altered the nature of regional mobility. With the establishment of nation-states, the drawing of borders where none had previously existed, and the development of modern transport infrastructures, the ways in which the Middle East’s residents could move, the places to which they could go, and even the means they used to get there, underwent profound transformations.
Additionally, the present moment is marked by regional crises from Iraq to Syria that have enabled the undermining of national borders and the rise, alongside them, of unofficial alternatives demarcating territories and people along new lines. But, despite the unprecedented control that states, governments and, now, militias, have over the movement of their citizens and the flow of goods and people in and out of their territories, individuals and groups continue to find ways to bypass limitations on movement and to invent alternative means of flowing between spaces.
This series takes as its starting point an acknowledgment of the impact that movement and mobility has had and can have on the shaping of identities – cultural and political, national and ethnic – and the effect that the enabling and/or disabling of certain patterns of travel and motion has had and can have on the shaping of personal destinies, historical narratives and collective memories. 
We are seeking contributions that engage either the history of the Middle East’s “disappeared” routes or the present of its unofficial, alternative ones. We want to hear the stories of those, for example, whose lives were irrevocably transformed when a national border severed the economic and personal links between what were once known as northern and southern Galilee, or the perspectives of those who helped dig the recently destroyed tunnels beneath Gaza.
We are looking to understand how the creation, transformation and destruction of various “routes”, historically and contemporarily, has affected the lives of people in the Middle East, soliciting stories about forgotten railways, oceanic migration, extinct trams, smuggling paths, neo-nomads, pre-Sykes-Picot cross-border romances, businesses, rivalries and cultural exchanges, Arab nationalism before the rise of the Arab nations, and the like.
This series is a collaboration with Knooz Room, an interactive story-telling project that employs multimedia, interactive software and offline installations, and is focused on oral histories from the Middle East. The series will include a major multimedia/interactive component by mapping out the collected testimonies – part of Mashallah News’ aim to “remap” the Middle East one story at a time. 
We are seeking written contributions between 500 and 1000 words in length. Contributors are asked to submit photos of the transport hubs dealt with in their pieces as well as testimonial videos (recorded on simple devices), in the case of narratives based on collected oral histories. The stories and multimedia will be integrated into an interactive map that will turn the series into a comprehensive, long-form story. 
We envision “Routes” more as a collective research project than merely a curated series. We are not looking for submissions to meet strict editorial guidelines or to fill thematic blanks that we’ve thought up, but for collaborators interested in exploring this rich, nuanced topic alongside us. 
If you’re interested in contributing to this series, please submit a 100-word pitch along with a biography and samples of your previously published work to info@mashallahnews.com by September 5th. Contributors will be financially compensated, but due to the varied nature of the submissions, we cannot specify an exact payment amount before receiving them.
Picture: Abandoned railway in Mar Mikhael, Beirut. Picture by AMI, from our book Beirut Re-Collected (Tamyras). 

“ROUTES” SERIES

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

We’re very excited to announce a call for submissions for our latest series! A collaboration with Knooz Room, who are also developing our new website, “ROUTES” will be the first project to be featured on Mashallah News “2.0.” 

The decline of the Ottoman Empire and the colonial encounter it facilitated between the Middle East and Europe dramatically and permanently altered the nature of regional mobility. With the establishment of nation-states, the drawing of borders where none had previously existed, and the development of modern transport infrastructures, the ways in which the Middle East’s residents could move, the places to which they could go, and even the means they used to get there, underwent profound transformations.

Additionally, the present moment is marked by regional crises from Iraq to Syria that have enabled the undermining of national borders and the rise, alongside them, of unofficial alternatives demarcating territories and people along new lines. But, despite the unprecedented control that states, governments and, now, militias, have over the movement of their citizens and the flow of goods and people in and out of their territories, individuals and groups continue to find ways to bypass limitations on movement and to invent alternative means of flowing between spaces.

This series takes as its starting point an acknowledgment of the impact that movement and mobility has had and can have on the shaping of identities – cultural and political, national and ethnic – and the effect that the enabling and/or disabling of certain patterns of travel and motion has had and can have on the shaping of personal destinies, historical narratives and collective memories. 

We are seeking contributions that engage either the history of the Middle East’s “disappeared” routes or the present of its unofficial, alternative ones. We want to hear the stories of those, for example, whose lives were irrevocably transformed when a national border severed the economic and personal links between what were once known as northern and southern Galilee, or the perspectives of those who helped dig the recently destroyed tunnels beneath Gaza.

We are looking to understand how the creation, transformation and destruction of various “routes”, historically and contemporarily, has affected the lives of people in the Middle East, soliciting stories about forgotten railways, oceanic migration, extinct trams, smuggling paths, neo-nomads, pre-Sykes-Picot cross-border romances, businesses, rivalries and cultural exchanges, Arab nationalism before the rise of the Arab nations, and the like.

This series is a collaboration with Knooz Room, an interactive story-telling project that employs multimedia, interactive software and offline installations, and is focused on oral histories from the Middle East. The series will include a major multimedia/interactive component by mapping out the collected testimonies – part of Mashallah News’ aim to “remap” the Middle East one story at a time. 

We are seeking written contributions between 500 and 1000 words in length. Contributors are asked to submit photos of the transport hubs dealt with in their pieces as well as testimonial videos (recorded on simple devices), in the case of narratives based on collected oral histories. The stories and multimedia will be integrated into an interactive map that will turn the series into a comprehensive, long-form story. 

We envision “Routes” more as a collective research project than merely a curated series. We are not looking for submissions to meet strict editorial guidelines or to fill thematic blanks that we’ve thought up, but for collaborators interested in exploring this rich, nuanced topic alongside us. 

If you’re interested in contributing to this series, please submit a 100-word pitch along with a biography and samples of your previously published work to info@mashallahnews.com by September 5th. Contributors will be financially compensated, but due to the varied nature of the submissions, we cannot specify an exact payment amount before receiving them.

Picture: Abandoned railway in Mar Mikhael, Beirut. Picture by AMI, from our book Beirut Re-Collected (Tamyras). 

4 weeks ago 6 notes

Gaye Su Akyol - Yaz Gazeteci Yaz (Selda Bağcan Cover)

1 month ago 1 note

LOVE from thetehrantimes:

Tarlan Rafiee


First row: Once upon a time/10  - 2013 (Hand coloured giclee print - 25x33 cm)

Second row: Once upon a time/2 - 2013 (Hand coloured giclee print - 25x33 cm)

Third row: Once upon a time/4 - 2013 (Hand coloured giclee print - 25x33 cm)

Fourth row: Once upon a time/6 - 2013 (Hand coloured giclee print - 25x33 cm)

Last one: Happiness package/12 - 2014 (Silk screen,acrylic - 100x120 cm)

1 month ago 197 notes

The Djerbahood project gathers 100 artists from 30 countries to paint the streets and walls of Erriadh, a village in Djerba, Tunisia. The aim of this project is to transform the village into an open-air gallery of art, during July and August. Here are some of our favorite graffitis.

1 month ago 5,499 notes